5 Simple Ways to Cut Down on Toy Clutter

5 Ways to Cut Down on Toy Clutter

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post sharing 5 Reasons I’m Glad We Don’t Have Many Toys. So many of you commented and said you’d love to cut down on toys but you don’t know where to start or how it’s really feasible when you constantly have friends and relatives giving you new toys.

If you’re feeling like you wish you could have fewer toys, but you just don’t know how to pull that off — especially thanks to generous grandparents! — here are some suggestions:

1.  Set Boundaries

I’m a big believer in having a home for everything in your home. Meaning, everything has a place for it to reside — be a drawer, a cupboard, a basket, a tub, or a box. Not only does this help your house stay cleaner and more organized, it also allows you to place limits on what you have.

For instance, when we lived in a little basement apartment, we had almost zero room for toys, but I designated one of the end tables that had a cupboard door on it as the place where we kept Kathrynne’s toys. If it didn’t fit in there, we couldn’t keep it — otherwise we’d be stepping on or over it all day long!

Nowadays, we have a tub for LEGOs, a barrel in the garage for outdoor toys (balls, bats, etc.), a shelf in a closet where we keep games, and a few baskets in the kid’s closet for misc. toys (walkie-talkies, stuffed animals, etc.)

Need help getting started designating a place for your toys? Check out Five Steps for a Pared Down Playroom.

5 Practical Ways to Cut Down on Toy Clutter

If you have more than one child, you could consider having assigned areas for each individual child’s toys and then a place for toys that everyone shares. You might consider having a tub or shelf labeled with each child’s name. Our rule at our house is that when the shelf or tub is full, you can’t get any new toys until you get rid of some that you already have.

Since my kids are really, really into LEGOs, we’ve had to put some measures in place to help them not take over a room or area of our house. The kids know they are expected to have them all picked up once per day when they clean up their room (where the LEGOs usually are).

If they bring the LEGOs into other parts of the house and don’t pick them up when they are done or if they leave them lying out in their room after they’ve been told to pick them up, the LEGOs are put up for 4-6 weeks — which is a pretty huge punishment for our LEGO-lovers. It’s happened a few times and it’s been enough to convince them to be very responsible in keeping them put away when they aren’t in use.

5 Practical Ways to Cut Down on Toy Clutter

2. Only Keep What You Love

We love quality, versatile toys in our home: things like LEGOs, art supplies, craft supplies, outdoor toys, and educational toys. We try to have toys that encourage creativity rather than solely entertain.

And here’s the thing we’ve discovered: our kids would much rather play with cardboard boxes or build tents with old sheets, folding chairs and couch pillows than have the latest and greatest gadgets and gizmos. The few bells-and-whistle toys we’ve had in the last couple of years served to entertain for a short while and then were abandoned for LEGOs, puzzles, and creative play.

5 Practical Ways to Cut Down on Toy Clutter

We try to go through our house very regularly and get rid of things we no longer love, use, or need. There’s no point in keeping something around if no one likes it or uses it on a regular basis. Is it sitting around untouched for weeks on end? Is it broken? Does it have parts which can’t be replaced? Get rid of it!

If you have toys that are in good condition that you no longer use or love, donate them to a daycare or children’s home, sell them in a garage sale or consignment sale, drop them off at Goodwill, sell them on a Facebook Yard Sale Groups or Craigslist, or even have a Toy Swap Party.

Here’s a creative idea from The Bargain Shopper Lady:

My boys started a “friend toy swap” which is their idea of giving to their friends. Anytime they have a friend over to play, they let their friend choose one toy to take home. I approve all toys before the friend leaves just in case they are trying to give something away, such as “their brother’s favorite toy” or something that they just got and is still pretty new.

This method is great for us! We have friends over often and it really helps with the clutter! My children are also learning that they really enjoy giving toys they don’t play with as often to their friends!

3. Ask For Consumable Gifts

One of the biggest reasons parents have told me that they can’t cut down on toy clutter is because of their well-meaning and generous relatives and grandparents who are constantly gifting various things to their kids.

First off, if this is the case for you, I just want to encourage you to remember that this is a blessing that you have grandparents who want to give to and bless their grandchildren. Not all families have this. So be grateful for it instead of resenting it.

Always remember that the relatives are likely buying things for your children because they love them. In almost every case, they aren’t purposefully seeking to annoy or irritate you.

My Completely Honest Review of Kiwi Crate

That said, I encourage you to graciously and lovingly communicate your preferences to your relatives. Perhaps they don’t know you are short on space or really would love it if they spent less money. Maybe they feel obligated for some reason. Whatever it is, come up with a plan to talk about the issues in a calm and loving manner.

However, don’t just go to Grandma and say, “Sorry, we don’t have room for your toys. Please don’t ever buy another toy again.” Give your relatives some options.

Here are some consumable/no-clutter gift ideas you could suggest:

  • Bubble bath, crayons, & sidewalk chalk
  • A special outing with the grandparents
  • Magazine subscriptions
  • Subscription to craft kit boxes — like Doodle Crate, Kiwi Crate, and Tinker Crate — our kids got these for Christmas/their birthdays and love, love, loved them!
  • Subscriptions to LEGO’s Pley membership — Kathrynne got this for her birthday and has loved it!
  • Craft supplies
  • Crayons, paper, coloring books, and other craft supplies
  • Gift cards for restaurants/treats
  • Memberships to Local Attractions

Check out the comments on this post here for many, many more ideas.

You could also ask for clothes, books, educational toys, outdoor toys, LEGOs, gift cards, or even for them to donate money to your child’s college fund!

At the end of the day, though, be sure you don’t deprive the grandparents of getting the joy that comes from giving. Just as you would like to see change on their part, be willing to meet them halfway–or more! It might never be perfect or ideal, by openly communicating in a loving manner and presenting some options and being willing to listen and show appreciation to them, you just might be able to come to a happy medium.

5 Ways to Cut Down on Toy Clutter

4. Rotate Toy Collections

If you feel like you have too many toys, but you don’t want to part with what you have, consider a rotational toy system. Put away half the toys for a month. After a month, put away the toys you currently have and get out the toys which were put away. You could even do this on a quarterly basis.

This method can help you to see what toys your children really like and use. It also might help encourage more contentment with you already have since your children will probably feel like they are getting “new” toys quite often — when really it’s just the same old toys they’ve always had being presented in a new way!

Day of the Week Tubs{See Stephanie’s Day of the Week Tub System here.}

One toy rotation system we’ve used in our home when our kids were little was the Day of the Week Tub System. This idea has so many variations, but the basic gist is to divide most of the toys in your home into seven groups and put them in seven different tubs labeled with the days of the week.

Your children can then play with the appropriate tub each day. It keeps things rotated and fresh, while creating less mess.

5. Don’t Shop for Toys at Garage Sales or Dollar Store

I know, I know! There are so many supposedly “good deals” to be found at garage sales and dollar stores when it comes to kid’s toys. But like I often say, if you don’t need it and it’s just going to be cluttering up your home, it’s not a good deal for you — no matter how inexpensive the price is.

So unless it’s something you really need, it’s consumable, or you’re planning to get rid of it after they play with it for a few weeks, just don’t buy it. Because there’s no point it filling up your house with stuff that you then have to pick up, clean up, care for, organize, and (maybe even) get frustrated by!

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What ideas and suggestions would you add to my list? How do YOU cut down on toy clutter at your house?

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21 Surprising Stats About How Much Clutter We Really Have

21 Surprising Stats About Clutter

Woah! This article on Becoming Minimalist was pretty astounding.

Here’s a snippet:

Today, increasing data is being collected about our homes, our shopping habits, and our spending. The research is confirming our observation: we own too much stuff. And it is robbing us of life.

Here are 21 surprising statistics about our clutter that help us understand how big of a problem our accumulation has actually become.

1. There are 300,000 items in the average American home (LA Times).

2. The average size of the American home has nearly tripled in size over the past 50 years (NPR).

3. And still, 1 out of every 10 Americans rent offsite storage—the fastest growing segment of the commercial real estate industry over the past four decades. (New York Times Magazine).

You’ve got to go read the rest of the 21 Stats on Clutter over here.

Thanks to Amy for the link to this article!

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HUGE List of FREE Homeschool Curriculum & Resources

 

This is the weekly list of Free Homeschool Curriculum and Resources compiled by Jamerrill from FreeHomeschoolDeals.com. If you aren’t a homeschooler, but you’re a parent, teacher, babysitter, or nanny, you’ll probably find at least a few useful freebies in this list. You may also want to go through the Educational Deals and Freebies from earlier this week for more.

We have lots of great resources this week for everyone from preK to high school. If you need a break from teaching check out one of these Top 14 FREE Educational Websites for Kids . Then you can get out in the sunshine with one of our nature resources below that involve gardening and nature studies.

Preschool

Brown Bear is a favorite book for most preschoolers. Don’t miss these Free Brown Bear Playdough Mats.

Here are FREE Alphabet Coloring Pages, a FREE Letter S Pack, and a FREE Cut and Paste Alphabet Learning Book for hands on alphabet learning!

If your little guy loves TMNT, here is a FREE Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles PreK Pack.

Geography and History

FREE Geography pack

This FREE Continents and Ocean Pack is an excellent resource if you are studying world geography.

If you enjoy notebooking and history, here is a FREE Civil War Notebooking Unit or these Free Florence Nightingale Notebooking Pages.

Unit studies more your thing? Try this FREE Green Mountain Boys Mini Unit Study .

Themed Learning Packs

Themed learning packs are so much fun! Choose one or do them all:

Language Arts Resources

This FREE Spring Chicks Language Arts Pack is so cute and a great learning resource, too!

Use this FREE Hamburger Essay Outline to teach your child to write.

Here or hear? Your child can learn what word to use with this FREE Homophone Spelling Charts.

These FREE Superhero Readers will encourage your child to read.

Music

These FREE Orchestra Cards (3 part cards) and FREE Orchestra Coloring Pages Mini-book work together to teach your child all about the orchestra and musical instruments.

Math

FREE Bug Sorting Odd and Evens pack

This FREE BUG SORTING EVEN & ODD PACK has a fun theme and teaches math concepts, too!

I am ready for summer! These FREE Math Practice with Lemonade Stand Printables are a summer fresh way to practice math word problems.

Nature, Gardening and Science

Spring, nature, gardening, bring it on! Even if school has to continue, you can try one (or a few) of the free nature themed resources below.

Start with a FREE Plan Your Garden 4 Day Mini-Unit that is great for all ages!

Then study those plants and the bugs on them with a FREE Plant Nature Study and these FREE Crawly Creatures Cards.

Choose a new outdoor topic to learn about with this FREE Nature Study pack.

Learn the butterfly life cycle with FREE Butterfly Life Cycle Lessons.

Focus on animal classification with a FREE Animal Classification Lapbook.

Finally, you don’t have to head to the sea to study sea creatures. Use these FREE Sea Animal Nature Study Ideas instead.

Click here thousands of homeschool freebies!

*Don’t forget! If you are looking for additional free homeschool resources please check the huge growing list of free homeschool curriculum and resources on MoneySavingMom.com!

Jamerrill is the homeschooling mother of a large and growing family. After seasons of spending $50 or less annually to homeschool her children, she started Free Homeschool Deals in 2012 to help all families afford the homeschool life. You can follow the homeschool goodness on Pinterest and Facebook.

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