Pumpkin Crescent Rolls

Pumpkin Crescent Rolls

Guest post from Brigette Shevy

I absolutely love baking. I am constantly experimenting in the kitchen with my two favorite things to make – breads and desserts. I try new recipes on a weekly basis, and I rarely make the same thing twice.

My point in mentioning this? Well, I’m about to make an epic statement: I have made these pumpkin rolls again and again. And again. They’re that good, folks! When it comes to homemade rolls, it doesn’t get much better than these.

You can’t taste the pumpkin in these at all, but the pumpkin is there for a reason. It makes these rolls tender, soft and absolutely delicious (all while boosting your daily vitamin A intake!).

The finished rolls are a beautiful golden fall color – although the color varies depending on what kind of pumpkin you are using (in the pictures below, I used homemade pumpkin puree, so my rolls are lighter than they will be if you use canned pumpkin – but either is fabulous!).

These rolls freeze well, reheat well, and I’ve had great success with them still being nice and soft after several days. They are the perfect accompaniment for soups and stews, which my family eats a lot of during the fall and winter.

We love these plain or slathered with butter and honey – and we even cut them in half and use them as sandwich bread (for any sandwich filling that works well on soft, light bread).

I can almost guarantee these rolls will be a new favorite food at your dinner table too!

Brigette is a full-time wife and mother who is blessed with three amazing bundles of energy (ages 5, 3 and 1). She enjoys music, experimenting in the kitchen, homeschooling her children, finding great deals, long-distance running, and anything chocolate.

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Comments

    • Brigette says

      YES, you can absolutely use white whole wheat flour! I personally prefer mixing in at least some white flour along with the whole wheat, BUT they are still great using all whole wheat (especially if that’s what you are used to). If you try them using all whole wheat, let me know how you like them. :)

  1. Julie says

    I don’t have a bread machine, but I have a Bosch mixer that I use to make bread. What is the equivalent of a “short dough cycle?” I would love to make these tonight for dinner.

      • Brigette says

        If your machine doesn’t have two dough cycle options, just use the one it does have. It should work just fine. (“Short dough cycle” has one rise; “Long dough cycle” has two rises)

      • Brigette says

        You can totally make these without a bread machine!! It goes something like this: Mix the first 4 ingredients together over low heat just until butter is melted (you don’t want this to be too hot – if it gets too hot, let it cool slightly before adding it to yeast mixture). In a bowl, mix the salt, yeast and about 2 cups of flour. Pour the wet into dry and beat until for about 30 seconds. Add eggs and continue to beat until smooth – 1 or 2 minutes. Mix in additional flour by hand until you have a ball of dough. Turn onto a floured surface and knead until smooth (5 minutes?) adding additional flour as necessary. Let rise in a warm place until doubled – about 45-60 minutes. Preceed with instructions starting at “Divide dough into 2 pieces.”

        Hope this helps! :) These are SO yummy! :)

        • karen b says

          Thanks bunches, was just looking @ these this morning & thought (like alot of times) can’t make these because I don’t have a bread machine. then decided to check comments to see if any directions to help us folks that don’t have bread machines. we love pumpkin stuff so will def. be making these soon.

    • Brigette says

      The “short dough cycle” is equivalent to mixing, kneading and ONE rise. The “long dough cycle” on my machine has two rises. I don’t have a Bosch, but I would assume it does the mixing and kneading for you. So then you just need to let the dough rise 45-60 minutes and preceed with the instruction starting with dividing the dough into 2 pieces. Hope this helps! (Sorry I didn’t see comment in time for your dinner last night… maybe tonight? :))

  2. says

    Well, I just put Butterhorn dough in my bread machine before reading this. I stashed this recipe away for the future though!

    My husband LOVES your Butterhorns, Crystal (I am sure I would, too, but I’m gluten free…has anyone ever tweaked that recipe to be GF?!)…I usually make a batch and freeze them & he eats them as he wants. I also make a few “Pigs in a Blanket” but he eats those too fast to freeze them. ;)

  3. says

    These look yummy! They are going on my “must try” list. And, Brigette, have you thought of starting a baking or cooking blog?

    • Brigette says

      Aww – thanks! I’ve definitely thought about it… maybe someday when my kids are older (and we actually have internet at our house!!! :)).

    • Brigette says

      I would love to someday. I don’t know the first thing about computer or blogs though (I know… can you believe that I am actually genuinely related to Crystal? :)) I would have to learn a LOT before attempting anything like that! But thanks for the encouragement. :)

  4. Sara says

    How much is in one package of yeast? The yeast I have is in a jar…not sure how to measure it out that way.

    • Brigette says

      Yes, you can make these by hand and then bake them in the oven. In this recipe, I’m only using the bread machine to mix up and knead the dough – not to actually bake them. I wrote out the basic idea of how to make these by hand to another commentor, so I’m copying and pasting it here again:

      “You can totally make these without a bread machine!! It goes something like this: Mix the first 4 ingredients together over low heat just until butter is melted (you don’t want this to be too hot – if it gets too hot, let it cool slightly before adding it to yeast mixture). In a bowl, mix the salt, yeast and about 2 cups of flour. Pour the wet into dry and beat until for about 30 seconds. Add eggs and continue to beat until smooth – 1 or 2 minutes. Mix in additional flour by hand until you have a ball of dough. Turn onto a floured surface and knead until smooth (5 minutes?) adding additional flour as necessary. Let rise in a warm place until doubled – about 45-60 minutes. Preceed with instructions starting at ‘Divide dough into 2 pieces.’”

      Let me know if you have any more questions.

  5. Rebekah Williams says

    Can most bread makers handle 5+ cups of flour plus other ingredients?? (These look DELICIOUS! Have you ever tried to make them 100% ww?)

    • P says

      Could this be done without a bread maker? I do not have one and am wondering how to do it without one? This looks so good – I really want to try it!

        • Brigette says

          P and Ashley H: These can definitely be made by hand! I already replied with the approximate instructions to a couple of others who were wondering the same thing, so check out what I wrote in the above comments. Let me know if you have any other questions. Hope you enjoy them!

      • says

        I make similar rolls without a bread machine. It’s a good workout for the hands. Mix together. Then let raise in a buttered bowl, in a warm place, with a towel on top. Once risen to twice the size, punch down. Separate into 2 equal parts, set in two buttered bowls, cover both bowls with towels, set in warm place again, and let rise again. Once risen the second time, then proceed with rolling out, cutting into rolls, and baking. :) I make a non-pumpkin version for all holidays, like all the women in my family have done for years. :)

    • Brigette says

      A 2-lb machine can handle up to 6 cups of flour for the dough cycle ( mixing, kneading, rising – NOT baking!). I did put “2-lb” in the instructions, but maybe I should have put it in bold type. If you have a 1-lb machine, it will not be big enough (but you could still make these by hand or half the recipe).

      I have made these with all white whole wheat flour (either grinding my own from white wheat, or using store bought), and they turn out great. I personally prefer using at least some all-purpose, but they are still good with all whole wheat (just a little heavier) – especially if that’s what you are used to eating.

      • Rebekah Williams says

        Great, thanks! We are used to 100% whole wheat, so I’ll give them a shot. :)

        My machine is a 2 lb machine, I’ve just never attempted more tan 4 cups of flour before. But the not-baking-it difference makes sense. :)

    • Brigette says

      I freeze these after baking, but it would probably work to do it before baking as well. Shape the dough into crescents and freeze before rising. Then let them thaw/rise for several hours on baking sheets before baking. Like I said, I haven’t tried this, but I’ve done it with other rolls recipes, so I’m guessing it should work. :)

  6. Amy L. says

    These are rising for the final time as I write this, and they look delicious already! As I was rolling them up, I was imagining all the different ways I could flavor these on the inside- garlic butter, cinnamon-brown sugar and butter (which would make a crescent cinnamon roll…yum!), or maybe even a schmear of Nutella!