This week’s gluten-free menu

Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Waffles

Breakfasts

Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Waffles, fresh carrot/orange Juice
Green Monster Smoothie
Fresh orange juice, cereal
Gluten-free toast, scrambled eggs, fruit
Oatmeal with brown sugar and raisins
Cereal
Breakfast cookies, fruit

Lunches

Refried beans with salsa and corn chips, salad
Hard boiled eggs, sweet potato chips, applesauce, gluten-free cookies
Gluten-free pasta, hamburgers, steamed broccoli, apple slices
PB&J on rice cakes, carrot sticks, apple slices
Beans, rice, carrot sticks
Tuna salad, carrot sticks
Leftovers

Snacks

Fruit/veggies
Granola Bars
Breakfast cookies
German Fudge Bites

Dinners

Meatloaf, potatoes, steamed broccoli
Baked chicken, tossed salad, mashed potatoes, fruit
Frito Chili Pie, fruit, brown rice
Goulash, tossed salad
Sweet Potato Chili, apple slices, carrot sticks
Dinner with extended family x 2

Freezer Cooking

Breakfast cookies
Sweet Potato Chili
German Fudge Bites

What’s on your menu this week? Share details and/or your link to your menu plan in the comments.

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Comments

    • says

      We’ve been experimenting with it over the last few weeks, so many of my recipes posted before then *aren’t* gluten-free. However, we’re excited at the difference we’re seeing in the health issues our child was having and plan to continue through the end of March, for sure.

      • says

        You probably already know, but I wanted to give a head’s up just in case (celiac diagnosed 4 years ago). Commercial oatmeals usually are NOT gluten-free. The oats are often harvested/transported/packaged with the same equipment that is used for wheat. Bob’s Red Mill makes a certified GF oats, and some have had success with the McCain’s (sp?) steel cut oats. But things like Quaker and store brands are not generally considered safe.

        Again, sorry if you already knew that – I just like to look out for others who might miss a hidden source of gluten cross-contamination.

    • hannah says

      you have so many great gluten free recipes! Looking forward to trying them out for my little girl :)

  1. says

    Ooh I hope you like the chili and fudge bites!

    I think you’ve just inspired me to pull out my waffle iron… goodness knows it’s been too long since that thing’s seen the light of day ;).

    Happy Monday!

  2. says

    Wellll since my family’s gluten-free, I think this is awesome!! I’m very curious about those breakfast cookies–my kids don’t love bananas plain, but they like them in smoothies. I wonder if they’d still like the banana-heavy recipe? I may give it a try, so we’ll find out!

    • says

      It depends. Most of the family isn’t too fond of the gf pasta unless it’s in something… does anyone want to recommend a brand of gf pasta that’s good? So far, we’ve not been too impressed.

      • says

        Trader Joes if you have them – best GF pasta (that’s affordable) so far. Sprouts stores sell an Italian sounding brand that I don’t remember off the top of my head – they’re also good, especially if you can catch them on their GF Jamboree weeks when they’re 25% off. Many celiacs in the community I’m in like Tinkyada – personally… I don’t. And DeBoles makes a good rice lasagna noodle.

      • says

        We skip the noodles and change our thought process. Why did I ever think that spaghetti sauce had to be over noodles? We now have Italian Stew. I serve it over sausage links for my husband.

        I’m finding that items that are labeled “gluten free” are rarely as healthy as a whole food alternative.

        Often times people like to use spaghetti squash for noodles, but that didn’t ever work in my home.

        We eat a primal / paleo based diet and it has cured many many issues from ADD to hypoglycemia! I wouldn’t label it gluten free though.

      • Carey says

        I personally like the corn based pastas because they seem to have a better texture than the rice pastas. I like the Heartland brand pastas that Walmart sells (and they’re more affordable!) and the quinoa/corn pastas from Ancient Harvest.

        • says

          I like Heartland’s texture, but I have to tell you that of the pastas we have tried Jovial tastes the most like regular pasta to me. My gluten free daughter makes her own when we have pasta so I don’t have to cook two separate pastas. I do this to keep the cost down. We can’t afford to have the entire family of six eating gluten free products. :)

      • says

        We really like the quinoa pasta from Azure Standard or Heartland pasta (available at Walmart). No one really cared for the rice pasta, corn isn’t bad, but the quinoa is the closest we have found to traditional pasta. We almost prefer it to wheat pasta now.

  3. stephanie says

    No offense to the following……I would starve at your house and feel so sorry for you and your family eating that way. That being said, you would probably freak out eating at my place. Lol. Variety is the spice of life. Question? How do you handle eating out at the extended families? Are they accommodating your lifestyle/menu choices?

    • says

      It looks like they are eating healthy, with adequate amounts of protein and vegetables, and a few treats thrown in for good measure. I see nothing there to feel sorry for…

  4. says

    Good for you, taking the plunge and going gluten free. It’s a big step!If you’d like some dairy/gluten substitutes to be able to make most any recipe please go to “substitutes” on my blog page. http://allergy-friendlytastebuds.blogspot.com/ Also, there might be some new recipe ideas for you. I have a bunch of friends who have taken the same plunge, and I made the blog to help them. I will have to check out some of your recipes!

  5. says

    Just started a gluten free diet for myself and LOVE all these ideas! I honestly felt really lost, but now I can easily put recipes and meals together. Thanks!

  6. Christina says

    Stephanie,

    While you said no offense was intended you did go on to suggest that eating this way is a “lifestyle” choice–like a diet. In my family, it is not lifestyle, it is literally life or death. Once you have seen your child stop breathing because of a food you tend to get very serious about what is in the house and placed on the table. We would love more variety but for a child with multiple life threatening allergies it just isn’t possible. I realize a comment is just that–a comment and I can’t tell what your tone is but please be careful with your words. All moms want to take of their children.

    To answer your question about extended family and friends. Most don’t understand. They think a little won’t hurt, or that we’re overreacting when we have separate cooking utensils or even cookware. They are offended when we bring food for the allergic child because they “forget” and add an ingredient that is fatal.

    Until we can find out why there are so many food allergies now and until my child outgrows them this is the lifestyle God has blessed us with and we will do our best with the foods she can eat and be thankful for every morsel.

    • Stephanie says

      You’re right of course. I would never mean for anyone’s life to be threatened. A more appropriate phrase may have been to each their own, but even that indicates choice, when for some there is none. Thank you for clarifying. Good luck on your journey to health.

    • Lana says

      I know what you mean about family thinking a little bit won’t hurt. Our oldest son was allergic to orange citrus fruits as a child and my Mom just could not be convinced even though she has many food allergies herself.

      I was extremely food allergic and could only eat 14 foods at one point in my life. Myself and my 2 daughters, one gluten intolerant and one very food allergic have been healed by an alternative medicine practitioner. Here is the website for the Dr who developed this treatment. http://www.hcmionline.com There is a listing of practitioners doing the treatment but there are so few right now that most would have to travel to be treated. We are fortunate to live 35 mintes from one. The treatment works by cleaning up the body and eliminating things that are suppressing the imune system. The body can heal and then the food intolerances are no longer an issue. It sounds too good to be true but after 27 years of struggling to eat I was willing to try it and I am so glad I gave it a shot.

  7. Karis says

    I have a similar sweet potato chili recipe but you add in mango juice and all spice – strange I know but REALLY yummy! It’s called Caribbean chili :)

  8. Christina says

    Stephanie,

    While you said no offense was intended you did go on to suggest that eating this way is a “lifestyle” choice–like a diet. In my family, it is not lifestyle, it is literally life or death. Once you have seen your child stop breathing because of a food you tend to get very serious about what is in the house and placed on the table. We would love more variety, but for a child with multiple life threatening allergies it just isn’t possible. I realize a comment is just that–a comment and I can’t tell what your tone is but please be careful with your words. All moms want to take of their children.

    To answer your question about extended family and friends. Most, like you, don’t understand. They think a little won’t hurt, or that we’re overreacting when we have separate cooking utensils or even cookware. They are offended when we bring food for the allergic child because they “forget” and add an ingredient that is fatal.

    Until we can find out why there are so many food allergies now and until my child outgrows them this is the lifestyle God has blessed us with and we will do our best with the foods she can eat and be thankful for every morsel and do what we can to educate others.

  9. says

    I am on an elimination diet free of the top 8 allergens to see what is triggering my exclusively breastfed 4 month old son’s horrible eczema. He seems to be sensitive like my 2 year old daughter who also have a plethora of allergies, nuts being life threatening. We love food so hopefully my weekly menu plans will be encouragement to others going through something similar or will just be fun for the “normal” folks like my hubby! http://tjandjessie.wordpress.com/2012/02/20/meal-plan/

    • Diane says

      I hope all is going well! I was on a total elimination diet (brown rice, turkey, pears, and potatoes) and have many friends who were dairy and soy free for their nursing children. I hope you find out what is triggering it soon. It can take patience to figure those things out, for sure.

    • says

      Been there. Keep working at it, and also carefully investigate any cleaning/personal hygiene products you and your child are coming in contact with. Anything with fragrance, fabric softener, and surfactants can be harmful to a little one’s skin.

  10. says

    Just wanted to chime in on the GF discussion….I have a degree in nutrition and during my time in school we learned in great detail how “potent” gluten is to someone who can not tolerate it. As a commenter mentioned earlier, even separate cookware needs to be used b/c if one tiny gluten particle {like the size of a pin head or smaller} lands on the plate of someone who can’t eat it, it can set off their system {and it takes a long time to repair/heal after a flare up}. Food allergies and intolerances are one of the biggest challenges families face and my hat’s off to those who live this daily!

    With all that said, here’s our menu plan:

    http://forfreeyatake.blogspot.com/2012/02/weekly-menu-plan-219-225.html

  11. Casey says

    Crystal,
    I’m curious to see how you make the breakfast cookies as I know you often don’t follow a recipe exactly. It looks good to me, but I’m considering subbing something else for the canola oil or trying pumpkin in place of the bananas. I love reading your play by play (when you post them.) Plus even if a recipe turns out a flop you let us know! That way we don’t make the same substituation or error. :)

  12. hannah says

    Crystal,
    I just wanted to say that I have been following your blog for a while and I love it. I also LOVE that you started going gluten free the same time we had to! Our oldest(4) just got diagnosed with celiac and I am always trying to figure out different things without spending too much! Thank you! God bless!

  13. Heather says

    I was curious Crystal……are you putting everyone in the house in a gluten free diet? How is that working? I put my youngest child on a gluten free diet for a time but our doctor recommended that I not hold my other two children to that diet as it could have a negative impact on their health if they did not gluten tolerance issues. It was tough trying to balance the special needs of the one vs the other two. It ended up that gluten free diet did not improve my son’s health (it was an experiment as he is autistic and sometimes gluten intolerances can manifest like autism) It sure would have been easier to serve everyone that same thing instead of having to come up with something different just for the one.

    • says

      The rest of the family is eating some gluten, just quite a bit less than usual. Since we’re mostly focusing on eating whole foods, this hasn’t been too difficult to pull off and it’s worked quite well.

  14. cathy says

    we do buckwheat flour pancakes (they are ok for gluten free despite the name!) and our daughter loves them. This is for our family of 3 so you’d have to up it: 1 C buckwheat flour; 1 C dairy free liquid; 1 egg ; 1 T melted butter or oil; 1/4 c brown sugar; 1/2 frozen blueberries. Stir, add more liquid or BW flour to desired consistency–cook then drizzle w/butter and syrup and enjoy! I’ve found you can leave out the egg and it makes no difference.

  15. says

    Hi Crystal, I’m impressed with the array of different foods you serve each week! I’m definitely not as creative as you.
    On my blog, the Daily Citron, I write about simplifying my menu planning by using “theme nights”- like burger night, international night, Taco Tuesday… I find it a little less overwhelming to plan the menu when I have guidelines to follow.

  16. Amy says

    I was diagnosed with Celiac one year ago and I can’t believe the improvement it has made in my life! I have also chosen to go dairy and corn free as well! It is great to see you posting recipes – it is giving me more ideas (like the coconut milk whipped cream – yum!)

    Just an FYI – most oatmeal isn’t gluten free – you probably already know, but just wanted to give you a heads up since I didn’t initally realize it when I went GF! Trader Joe’s sells great, high-quality GF rolled oats and brown rice pasta for very cheap prices!

  17. Katherine says

    I’ve been wondering how you make your mashed potatoes? I only know how to make them with cow’s milk and butter. Haven’t been able to come up with an edible non-dairy option yet.

    • says

      Almost forgot! If you can’t drink milk, I would use light coconut milk or something mild here as a substitute instead of soy, which I have found can be overpowering.

  18. says

    Thanks for letting us share our links – here’s mine: http://www.nellbe.com/2012/02/27/weekly-menu-plan-with-gluten-free-meal-ideas-7/

    I really can’t help with the brands of gf pasta as I am in Australia and I use mainly Orgran, not sure if they are available there but if you can get a blend of rice and corn pasta thats always good. I also always use a big pot with lots of water and don’t cook too much at once. I do 250 grams (about 1/2 pound) at once. Good luck.