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The Top 3 Audiobook Services (& why we decided not to sign up for any of them!)

The Top 3 Audiobook Services

So, I’m kind of embarrassed to admit this, but as I’ve alluded to, I only recently really discovered the wonders of audiobooks. Okay, I’ve listened to some in the past, but I never really got why people were such big fans of services like Audible.

To me, it just seemed like one more thing to sign up for and get charged for every month and I was all like, “Why pay for a service when there are FREE audiobooks available to listen to all over the internet?”

However, recently, the kids needed to finish up a book for a school project and I’d been doing so much reading that my voice was starting to fail, so we downloaded the audiobook. It was amazing! They enjoyed listening to it and were able to finish it in the allotted time and my voice didn’t completely die.

(I know, I know, it’s amazing that I can talk as much as I can without having these issues all the time! But something about public speaking or reading aloud takes a much bigger toll on my voice than just regular talking does! For real.)

Jesse has really gotten into audiobooks in the last few months, too. He’s been listening through a series of books and loves the convenience of getting a lot of “reading” in while doing other things, too!

Seeing how much he was loving audiobooks (and how much “reading” he was fitting into his day) inspired me to give them a try again. And oh my goodness! What I’ve been missing!!

There are a lot of books that I would prefer to hold and read and underline. But there are many other books that are perfect for listening to. Plus, I am finding that I can get through a long audiobook in about 7 days — just by listening while doing my makeup, cleaning, cooking, and other miscellaneous tasks throughout the day. That is QUITE exciting to me!

As a result of this newfound love for both of us, Jesse and I started looking into our options for audiobook services. Because he loves to research and because I love to get a good deal, we’ve spent the last two months checking out all our options, asking other people for advice and ideas, and trying out different services to see what would work best for us.

I thought you might enjoy hearing our thoughts on the top 3 picks for PAID audiobook services (I’ll be doing a separate post next week on FREE audiobook services — stay tuned for that!):

The Top 5 Audiobook Services

1. Audible

We went to Audible.com first. Why? Probably because that’s just what I think of first when I think of audiobooks.

Audible is owned by Amazon and they are by and large one of the most well-known audiobook services out there. The service costs $14.95 per month and that gives you access to download one book every month. If you’d like more than one book, you can purchase other books at 30% off. If you don’t like a book, you can exchange it for another — for free.

Pros to Audible

They have a HUGE selection of audiobooks. In fact, I’m going to wager to guess that if there is an audiobook for something, they likely have it.

Their service is very, very easy to use. Just download the app to your device, purchase audiobooks right through your Amazon or Audible account with just a few clicks, and you can start listening almost immediately.

Cons to Audible

They are expensive. Compared to some of the other options below, Audible is very expensive. Your $14.95 per month subscription only gives you one credit per month. Most audiobooks are one credit, which means that you’re paying $14.95 per month for one audiobook.

If you don’t use it, you still get charged. It’s $14.95 per month — whether you download and listen to an audiobook or not. You can choose to put your membership on hold for up to three months, though. You can save credits in your account — though they don’t all roll over and there’s a limit to how many you can have in your account at a time.

You can sign up for a free 3-month trial of Audible here, if you’re a Prime member. If you’re not a Prime member, you can sign up for a free one-month trial.

The Top 5 Audiobook Services

2. DownPour

Downpour operates similarly to Audible, though it is not at all as popular or well-known. It is less expensive, but the catalog is also smaller than Audible. They still have around 60,000 titles to choose from, though!

Pros to Downpour

It’s less expensive than Audible. You’ll save $2 per month to go with Downpour versus Audible.

Your credit don’t expire as quickly. Whereas Audible has a limit of five unused credits at a time in your account with the $14.95 per month membership, Downpour allows you to have up to 12 credits in your account.

Cons to Downpour

They have fewer titles. Though their catalog is continually expanding, t hey might not have all of the titles you are looking for.

Your credits expire after a year. Unused book credits expire within a year of being issued. If you don’t use them, you lose them.

You can sign up for a free month of Downpour here.

The Top 3 Audiobook Services

3. ChristianAudio

ChristianAudio is the least expensive option of all three of these. And, as you can imagine, they have a much smaller selection. They currently offer around 5,000 different titles to choose from.

For $14.95 per month, you get four credits. Audiobook “costs” vary pretty widely, but they do have quite a few that are one and two credits. So potentially, you could get three to four books for just $14.95 per month. They also have a larger plan that is $24.95 per month and that gives you eight credits.

Pros to ChristianAudio

They are inexpensive. You can get up to four books for just $14.95 total per month. Compared to Audible and Downpour, that’s a great deal!

They have a great selection of kid’s audio. This was one factor that I considered a great perk. If you like to listen to audiobooks as a family, definitely check out their kid’s audio selection. Many of them are just one credit each, too.

Cons to ChristianAudio

They only have Christian titles. As you can expect from the name, they pretty much are exclusively Christian titles.

They have a very limited selection. I read a wide variety of books, so there’s a good chance that they wouldn’t have a number of titles I really would love to read.

You can sign up for a free 30-day trial membership to ChristianAudio here.

The Final Verdict

After a lot of research and discussion, we chose to go with NONE of these services. Yes, for real. We decided that none of them were a good fit for what we were looking for and/or they were going to be too expensive to feed our mutual audiobook addiction.

Instead, thanks to the encouragement of some of you, we fell in love with the free audiobook apps from our library. Stay tuned for my full review of those next week + other tips on how to download and listen to audiobooks for FREE.

Do you have or have you had a membership to any of these audiobook services? If so, I’d love to hear your thoughts!

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80 Comments

  • Marianne says:

    Some people don’t realize that you may not need to pay a monthly fee to purchase audiobooks from these services. I have an account and have made one-time purchases audiobooks from both Audible and ChristianAudio. ChristianAudio offers a free audiobook every month that anyone can get just by creating an account, no purchase necessary. It’s usually not a current bestseller, but they are usually reasonably new, popular books. And Audible has members-only sales that you can take advantage of even if you have an “inactive” account.

    • Thanks SO much for mentioning that! I’m definitely going to mention the free audiobooks option next week when I share about how to get audiobooks for free. That’s one of many great ways you can get free audiobooks!

    • Guest says:

      I was going to comment the same! We have an Amazon Prime membership and we just buy what we want as we want it and play it through the Audible app. We primarily use them on road trips.

    • Carol says:

      I am an Amazon Prime member and I can purchase as I go for as little as $1 a book. It gives me the option when I download my free book to purchase the Audible version. I love it!

  • Cassie says:

    I started to email you about OverDrive from the library but thought, surely, she’s tried that and must not like it. I forget that not everyone goes to the library as often as I do. I’ve been using OverDrive for over a year. I drive two hours each day to get to and from my job. So that’s about 10 hours of “reading” I get to do each week. I also listen to lots of podcasts (Car Talk, Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, Good Job Brain, The Hidden Brain, Poddy Break, just to name a few). You should give those a chance too. Great way to make folding towels go faster. Good Job Brain has good trivia that my kids usually enjoy also.

    • Yes! As mentioned in the post, I’ll be sharing about Overdrive next week + more resources for finding FREE audiobooks! 🙂

    • Danielle Spears says:

      I need to look into the OverDrive. I love using the library for books to borrow and have thought about the OverDrive. So are the podcasts part of it?

  • Or! To get access to audiobooks for free, get a library card and sign up for Overdrive and Hoopla. They have lots of popular titles. For classics, librivox.org has tons of audiobooks and they’re all free. The only downside is you don’t always get a great narrator from librivox, but I have a few favorites after listening to several books on the site.

  • Mary says:

    If you are an Amazon Prime member, you can do a search for “free 3 month trial for Audible.com”. I did and found a link that worked to give me 1 free credit for 3 full months. I liked the service so much I continued with it. We are also enjoying free audiobooks from http://www.LibriVox.com.

  • Mary says:

    I’m so sorry – the link should have been https://librivox.org/

    The books read there are in the public domain but we’ve found some that we’ve enjoyed very much.

  • Cheryl says:

    You can get free downloads of audio books from the library on your digital device using the Overdrive app or by going to overdrive.com.

    • Yes, as I wrote in the post, our verdict was that we aren’t going with any of these services and we landed on the library apps instead. I’ll share more about those, how they are working for us, and other ways to get free audiobooks next week. I was planning to include all that in this post, but it was getting WAY. TOO. LONG. 🙂 So I decided to split it into two parts! 🙂

  • Tiffany says:

    We looked into Audible too, but with 4 different people listening to audiobooks PLUS listening to audiobooks in the car, we go through 8-10 books a MONTH! We LOVE Librivox for anything in the public domain (which is ALOT). Some of the readers aren’t the best, but it’s free and you can download on the spot (no waiting in line for a title to become available). We also love Overdrive from the library. Two podcasts for children that are free and have free audio books are Sparkle Stories and StoryNory. Last note, for kids we occasionally listen to the free episodes of Adventures in Odyssey online. Hope this helps! Looking forward to your post next week.

    • I’ll be talking about OverDrive and Librivox next week and thanks SO much for mentioning those two podcasts! Those are new-to-me and I can’t wait to check them out for my kids!

  • Danica says:

    I have to say the majority of the books that I have gotten from Audible are children’s books – and for me Audible is the better choice since I get to keep the titles whereas with Overdrive (which I love – haven’t really done too many audiobooks though) has a time limit. I have gotten books that I’m sure will be listened to many times. The other thing I like about Audible is that all of the books are just 1 credit, which can be a major savings on purchasing the book outright (or what you would pay to have it on disk). I’m looking forward to your next post.

  • Carissa says:

    We LOVE audiobooks! I have been reading this way for YEARS! I have also turned my husband on to them too! We only use the library resources for the last ten years, and have generally satisfied with it. Love using them as I do housework, long drives, our just time to zone out for some ‘me time’ in between the needs of my family. My kids love them too, they often listen to them while playing in their rooms doing things like legos, I feel like it has fostered their love of reading too! I see that you have tried Overdrive……our library also has One Click Digital! Also a great app!

  • Danielle Spears says:

    I am currently on a 1 free membership with 3 free books on Audible and I love it. I don’t like the price of the books though. Way to much for me. I have noticed that when I look at buying kindle books through amazon.com that a few have a whisper sync option for maybe 1.99 more. I have liked this since I don’t have to pay for the membership. Has anyone else used this?

  • Jon says:

    I have a concern about the use of audio books. I have a nephew that was given a membership at an early age, and he has spent a lot of time listening to books as a result. The only problem was that he would never just pick up a book and start reading, and recently we found out his reading skills weren’t what they should be. I believe it makes a person lazy by listening, and not actually reading a book. I can understand if it is used once in awhile, but when you become so dependent that your reading skills drop, it’s not worth any price.

    • Tiffany says:

      The research actually points to the opposite. My daughter is an avid reader (2 grades above level) and has been listening to audiobooks since she was three. It has created a love of books. My son on the other hand is a late reader and listens to audiobooks. It has not impeded his reading or made him not want to read…he just developed his reading skills at a later age.

    • Ashley P says:

      Eh, it depends. I think it matters less once you’re an adult. I was previously stuck in a very tedious job. There were some difficult parts that required me to focus, but the bulk of it was just filling out the same reports again and again. So I found myself getting very bored. I couldn’t read a physical book while working the reports (partially because I had to read the data in the report and partly because “for security reasons”, all paper of any kind was banned from our office).

      So I listened to audio books downloaded from the library to break the monotony. For over a year, ot was the only pleasure reading I had the time to do.

    • AnejjenA says:

      I agree. I have three kids who LOVE books. One kids primarily listens rather than reads. I believe one of the values in reading the book is the exposure to vocabulary and sight learning of unfamiliar words. When you listen, you may not acknowledge that word but when you read – you are forced to at least skim it.
      That’s not to say I don’t value the audio books – we are HUGE fans and go through a lot of them. I just don’t think they are a replacement for the physical books.

    • Lisa says:

      People think that children that are good readers make a good writers, but this is not the case. The best way for a child to become a good writer is to be read to, at a level slightly higher than their normal decoding level, throughout their formative years. (I would assume audiobooks may fall into this “reading aloud” category). Unfortunately, we usually stop reading to her children once they can read themselves. They then miss a great opportunity to get a good amount of language at a higher level into their brain. I’m paraphrasing Andrew Pudewa of The Institute of Excellence in Writing (iew.com) – he has an excellent talk on his site called Nuruting Competent Communicators…it’s very interesting.

  • Jk Lee says:

    Thank you so much for this post! I have just a couple weeks left on my Audible trial and while I lox it I cannot justify the cost. Looking forward to next weeks post! Thanks to all the commenters for their suggestions also!

  • Rebecca says:

    What about allyoucanbooks.com? Unlimited books for $20/month. Our kids go through them like crazy while they are playing with Legos and toys. I haven’t done it yet because I want to get them an iPod touch first, but that’s the one I’ll be going with sjnce they don’t cap it at 1 book per month. $15/month for 1 books? That’s insane.

  • Libby says:

    Can I just say I love that you ultimately decided on the LIBRARY! <3 That was my first response when I saw the title of this post! Two thumbs up there. Other matter….Hoping I'm not sticking my nose where it doesn't belong….I'm voice teacher/coach and am therefore super vigilant about taking care of voices! Consider seeking out a Speech-language Pathologist or voice coach if you are having voice troubles, especially as you do more public speaking. The last thing you want as a public speaker is to have nodules or polyps because you are speaking too low in pitch or too forcefully. They can help you find a technique for pitch/volume for projecting without tiring out your voice. Love your blog! Been a long time reader!

  • Shannon says:

    I love the idea of audio books and podcasts. They just don’t work for me. If I try to listen while I am doing something else, I end up focusing on what I am doing and not listening. This is great information to have for other family members, so thanks for sharing.

  • Amy says:

    I am also an audio book addict! My fringe hours are dedicated mostly to sewing and my desire to read was being frustrated, so they have been a HUGE blessing to me. I also try to listen a little during the day when cooking, or putting away laundry. In the car with the kids I’m trying to stretch their comprehension ability with kid friendly classics that I also want to knock off my list.

    I also have not found any of these memberships to be worth it for us, but I have gotten most of my books from Audible and Christian Audio. My brother has given me a free 3 month membership for Christmas a few years in a row, and while a member I’ve taken advantage of big sales. Christian audio gives a free book a month and has frequent sales that I’ve taken advantage of as well. I’ve asked for Audio Books for gifts from other family members (when they asked) as well.

    I guess even though I listen a lot I don’t consume a huge amount of books as my time is limited and I listen to more than one at a time so this has been more than enough for me. I’m also often interrupted so have to go back and repeat whole sections. I’ve also been trying to get through some LONG history books, balanced with shorter lighter books so it’s slow going. I don’t know honestly if even when my kids are bigger that I would devote so much time to listening to new books that a membership would be worth it! There’s so much else to do and I like to read “real books” as well.

    P.S. Crystal I did your MOYM and E courses and they have helped me so much!! I already had my priorities and somewhat of a schedule in place but I needed the nitty gritty help to really DO it. Sure enough accountability had been the missing ingredient for me as well and now I have someone I’m texting with in the mornings and evenings and another friend that I’m texting with about exercise and now scripture memorization. It feels so good to be finally making progress in all these areas! Thank you. I’ve been enjoying your scopes as well :).

  • Kellie Estep says:

    I use to be signed up for Scribd, they had audible books and regular ebooks. The great thing about them is they charge $8 a month for unlimited ebooks and audible and they have a pretty hefty selection, not as good as audible but still great selection of new and popular books as well as older ones. I cancelled my membership because they went to the credit system like audible. Its still cheaper than audible but I just now check out from my library on the apps. I loved how it was set up is why if it ever went unlimited i would pay for it again.

  • Naomi Brubaker says:

    We use audible from time to time. If there is a series like chronicles of Narnia or Lord of the Rings is less expensive to purchase (free credit) we just wait for the credit and load the series one at a time. So far it has been less expensive this way. We have a plan pick a series and then leave once we have all the books we want. I look forward to the next post on free options. Thanks for doing all the leg work for me.

  • Kristin says:

    I fell in love with audiobooks about 12 years ago when I had to travel a lot for my job. Since then, I have also had a 1.5 hour round-trip daily commute, and listened to audiobooks the whole time! I still do now, even though my commute is short, which is sometimes a problem, because I can’t finish longer books before they’re due back at the library! ;P I am fortunate that my local library and my library system in general has an extensive collection, so I’ve never felt the need for a paid service, even during those years when I had five or six on the front seat of my car all the time. I’ve used the Overdrive app as well and like that. Our library system also has Hoopla, which I have never tried. So I’d be interested in hearing your review of that in your next post, if that service is available to you as well. Happy listening!

  • Dana says:

    My son signed up for a free audible book download, and didn’t realize he’d signed up to have 14.95 a month taken out of his bank account until he was overdrawn, with a 40.00 overdraft fee. Not fun.

    We exclusively use our library, both the books on CD that they have in-house and the digital downloads.

  • Jessica says:

    I have the same trouble with reading aloud! It really strains my voice and always feels different. I try to read like I’m just talking regularly, but it doesn’t work. I don’t know if its because I have a quiet voice and try to project more when reading than when talking or what…but it’s really tough to have the want-to to read aloud bc it hurts!

  • Jessica says:

    I’m looking forward to hearing about your experience with Overdrive… my library has it, but it seems to have less than 1,500 titles and I haven’t been very successful in finding ones I wanted to listen to (I have borrowed a few ebooks with it though). I wonder if there are different “levels” that libraries can purchase?

    • So interesting! Has anyone else experienced this, too?

      • Rachel says:

        I think there must be “packages/levels” because our library has 2 Trilogies (The Youngest Templar and the False Prince) that has the first installment available on Overdrive of both series. The 2nd on the Templar. But neither the 2nd nor 3rd of False Prince nor the 3rd of the Templar. I looked at a library in a nearby large city and they had more of these series available on Overdrive. But they charge a fee for out of area membership. The good news – my local library has 2 and 3 of the False Prince on CD so I am checking those out. I’m not sure what I’m going to do to get the ending of the Templar. These are juvenile fiction titles by the way. But if you start a trilogy – you might want to be sure you can get all three parts LOL

      • Jessica says:

        So, after leaving the comment above, I poked around some more on my library’s Overdrive site and realized there is a way to recommend books to be purchased/added to the library’s collection. For example, Big Magic (one that you said you listened to on Overdrive), was not available to me, but I could recommend that it be purchased. So I guess you can recommend a book and then your library can choose to add it. I don’t know how often they act on the suggestions, but next time there’s a book we really want to listen to, I’ll give it a try.

    • becky says:

      I noticed this as well, that the library in my smallish town didn’t have much available on Overdrive. It seems different library systems access different “libraries” of digital books. I got a library card from the nearest large city (I live an hour away and was able to apply for a card online and they mailed it to me for free) and I noticed the big city library accesses something (via Overdrive) called “Digital Downloads” and it has much more selection than the “Ohio Digital Library” that my local town uses.

      Hoopla used to be my go-to for audiobooks because I could stream the book (Overdrive used to make you download the book and my phone was always short on space). But now Overdrive has a streaming option as well so I use it mostly. Spotify has some free audiobooks as well.

    • Kristin says:

      If I remember correctly, when my library first got Overdrive, it seemed like there weren’t very many titles, at least not ones I was interested in. At some point, their inventory increased *a lot* and at this point, is very robust. So maybe there are different levels of subscription for the libraries, I’m not sure.

  • Sue says:

    I have an hour long commute each way and audio books really work well with that. Listening to the news is part of my commute but 2 hours of news/day is often repetitive. I know about the library offerings and I’m looking forward to your post about other options.

  • katie says:

    As a librarian I think it is lovely that you mention the free services that we offer. People think old school when thinking of the library and really we offer so much- from streaming audiobooks, summer read clubs with prizes and programs for both children and adults.

  • Stephanie says:

    We use Audible and the library and love them both. The fee for Audible isn’t too expense for us since we used to purchase books on CD for trips and such. Now if we want extra audio books through Audible we buy more credits.

    The bonus is hubby and I share some authors and will listen to books repeatedly so owning them is much nicer.

    Our library allows for 10 digital items at a time so I often have a few books through there but the selection is not as nice.

    Thanks everyone for sharing. I am going to look into some of the other options as I firmly believe we can never have enough audiobooks.

  • Rachel P. says:

    Becuase of your encouragement (via scope), I logged into OverDrive to listen to free books from our library and LOVE it! I listened to “The 5 Love Languages of Children” and it has had such an impact on me. I’m sad to have to return it. My kids have loved listening to short & funny Amelia Bedilia stories while we eat lunch together. We still prefer real books most of the time. (In fact, when I suggested that we write a ‘choose your own adventure’ book as a family, using Google Forms, the kids were excited, until I said the book would only be digital!?!)

  • Deb says:

    We use audio books quite frequently. I have a number of free ones by taking advantage of the free trial months as often as they allow me. I also do whisper sync through Amazon.com which allows you to add an audio book version to the book you bought. I won’t pay much for it, but for some books this has been great. I have chronic migraines so reading isn’t an option many days. Listening to books allows me to keep reading. We love the feature that allows us to speed up the reading.

  • michele says:

    We use audible here. I find it is very much worth the money. They have sales quite often. I recently purchased 13 audiobook for $40 during one of their sales. Another thing some folks many not be aware of is that you can purchase an every other month plan through audible I stead of their monthly plan. Whisper sync through Amazon is another way to save money on audiobooks. You can have up to six credits in your account at a time and I have always been able to use them before they expire.

  • Amy Van Dyke says:

    I’ve been using the scribd app for over a year and I LOVE it! I live out of city limits and would have to pay $80/year just to check out books. So when I found scribd, it was a perfect fit for me. It was unlimited “like Netflix for books” but then they went to a credit system. I still have plenty of books to read and pay less than $10/month. New releases are there immediately, as well as some great oldies! You are not limited to choosing between audio books, you can also use the subscription to read digital copies! If it’s ok, this is my affiliate link: scribd.com/g/4gu70t

  • Tracy says:

    I’ve been using Audible for many years. If you take advantage of member perks and sales like 2 books for 1 credit or the daily deals (usually $2-$5 per book) you can really get a lot of mileage. I download about 4 books a month for somewhere between $20-$25. Not bad!!

  • Tracy says:

    Also forgot to mention that if you have Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited, you can get a decent number of titles that come with Audible narration ?

  • Tricia says:

    I saw some mention in the comments about buying the audio books directly (without subscription), but nothing about the whispersync option, which is often much cheaper. I have a love/hate attitude for audiobooks. I love them for the ability to keep reading when I need my hands &/or eyes elsewhere, but hate not being able to go full speed on the intense parts. The Kindle whispersync lets me jump back & forth seamlessly. Many Kindle books have the option to add the audio version for a reduced price, usually around $3 or $4.

  • Sara says:

    Audio books + Amazon Echo + homeschool = AMAZING!

  • Karen staal says:

    I love love love my library’s audiobook app I suggest everyone look into it

  • Sarah e hines says:

    Audible has plan for 1 credit for 14.95 or 2 credits for 22.95 . I love audible that’s what I have the 2 credits per month !

  • ADKGAL says:

    Overdrive is awesome, however, it varies from Library System to Library System. If you are a NY state resident, you can get a library card from the New York City Library and use their Overdrive which is extensive. Also, in your Library System’s version of Overdrive, you can make recommendations on books you would like them to get. As a trustee in my local library, we see the shift from “real” books to e-books as well as audio books. Some libraries also shelve “play away” books which are self-contained audio players which you can check out like a book. And don’t forget books on CD…….I guess what I’m saying is please support your local library first, before you buy. A lot of funding is dependent on usage and circulation.

  • RJ says:

    Our family travel a lot. We have made friends in many states. We exchange and add each other overdrive account to our overdrive list. We have access to many more books. It helps with homeschooling. If the book isn’t available at one,you can check others and borrow it. Works great. It keeps us in touch with wonderful friends.

  • Kalyn says:

    Go sign up for youraudiobookclub.com!!! The price is right and you are not “renting” anything so everyone in the house can enjoy.

  • Lydia Entweave says:

    I have tried to skim all comments – realizing this is a 2 year old post..and do not see any mention of audible’s option of an annual subscription for about 240$ for 24 credits.. i am always having to renew early and never pay more that 10$ pet book plus we often buy for less than 5$ on the daily deal or many sales. We share books among several adults and children and have hundreds in our library. We now check hoopla etc first.. my husband has enjoyed Libravox for years but I lack patience for the poor quality compared to most audible. Feel very fortumate to have access to all of this as several in our family group are quite dyslexic and with audible access have access to a world of books they woud never otherwise read. Found this good comparison because i got and email about audiblebooks.com??? My Audible credits never have time to expire AND I can return any book i just don’t care for. PS – exactly the same audio editions are sometimes found on Hoopla – not sure of the others – but if you get a ‘bad’ download, which happens, you still have used one of your credits (4) for the month and can not get it back plus several books i have wAnted to read came in broken down sections that took multiple credits. A lot more trouble than Audibles one book one credit…

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