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A Handmade Christmas: Snowflake Ornament

Guest post by Kimberly from Couponing University

Growing up, I can remember Thanksgiving to be just as exciting as Christmas at my Grandma’s home. Every year, she would make all ten of the grandchildren a Christmas ornament. These became the first gift of the season, coming at Thanksgiving so we could enjoy them for the month to come.

Her ornaments were most often intricately crocheted with amazing skill and great attention to detail. My grandmother’s thoughtfulness ran deep as she crafted us ornaments each year. She knew that her gifts would serve to fill our first tree of our own one day as we began our journey into adulthood when money might run tight and leave us with an otherwise bare tree.

As my Grandmother’s ornaments graced my very first tree just three years after she passed, I couldn’t help but pull up the memories of all those years in anticipation for Thanksgiving and a new ornament. Today, all my Grandmother’s ornaments have a special tabletop tree for themselves.

Sometimes, my Grandmother would make us something out of the ordinary, such as this snowflake ornament which was given to me in 1989. (Grandma would always label the back with the year.) We loved this ornament so much that my mother deconstructed the snowflake so that we could reproduce what seemed like a hundred of them for gifts to teachers, neighbors and friends.

Supplies:

  • Plastic mesh canvas (one sheet will make six completed ornaments)
  • White yarn
  • Pearl beads
  • Glitter fabric paint
  • Yarn needle
  • Scissors

Instructions:

::Cut two snowflakes following the pattern. To begin, cut 19 by 19 squares, then cut the ‘petals’. Once you have cut one petal, you can use your scissors as a guide to begin the next cut, just line them up with the inner line and start over.

::Cut a hole in the middle of the one of the snowflakes. The easiest way to do this is to fold the piece in half, count in two squares, and cut up two squares on each side. Then fold the other direction, again cutting up two on each side. This will be the top piece.

::Starting in the middle of the full snowflake piece, secure the yarn by creating the first stitch and making a knot. Continue to stitch the center.

::Bring the yarn up to the closest petal and stitch the veins.

::Bring the yarn to the side and overstitch the sides, making two stitches in each outer corner, until you come to the next petal.

::Continue in this manner until the bottom is complete, making a double knot at the end.

::Begin stitching the top snowflake in the veins of the petal, creating a double knot to secure. Continue to stitch the first petal.

::Overstitch outer edges, petals, as the bottom snowflake.

::Overstitch the inner edge and secure with a double knot.

::Using the glitter fabric paint, place a dot in the middle of the bottom snowflake to attach a bead. You may find it easier to use the needle to help hold the bead in place. Place beads in the same manner onto the stitched points on the petals of the top snowflake.

::Allow to dry overnight.

::Place the snowflake with the center hole on top of the second snowflake and turn 45 degrees.

::Gently pop the petals of the top snowflake into the centers of the bottom snowflake.

::Tie a loop with yarn into the top of one petal or attach an ornament hook for hanging.

::Write the year on the back with glitter fabric paint.

::Hang to dry.

Kimberly is a stay-at-home mother of two teenage daughters and a one year old boy. In her spare time, she blogs at Couponing University where she shares all she has learned about shopping smarter as well as other tricks for the Domestic Engineer of today.

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15 Comments

  • Melanie says:

    My Dad’s cousin used to make these before she passed away. I didn’t always appreciate the hand made gifts I got from her and other older relatives when I was young, but now wish I had.

  • Nicole C. says:

    That was a beautiful story and project! I love how something so simple as an ornament can mean so much to a person/family. Thank you!

  • Ashley says:

    We made these in school when I was younger. You can also do hearts for V-Day. Just get the plastic needle for kids and you are all set. 🙂 Very pretty!

  • Terri S says:

    My aunt made snowflakes just like this. She loved to give handmade ornaments as well. Lovely memories. Thank you for sharing how to make these, I have wanted to make these for some time. Merry Christmas!

  • Wendy says:

    I have these exact ornaments on my tree. My granny made them many, many years ago.

  • Amy says:

    I also have a snowflake ornament just like this one that my Grandma made years ago.

  • Carol says:

    Thank you for the excellent instructions. I give my kids one ornament each, each year. Sometimes Hallmark, or others. Some handmade. My daughter’s tree has many of them on it. I was at a loss this year as money is extremely tight. I have all the supplies on hand and enough time to create several of these before gift time.

  • Lizzie says:

    Very sweet. I used to make lots of plastic canvas:)

  • I got a snowflake like this as a gift back in the 80’s as well. I, too, replicated it, way back then. I was excited to see your instructions for this. I definitely would like to make more of these!

    Thanks for sharing.

  • Kimberly says:

    My grandma is a very crafty lady, although at age 91, her “eyes aren’t what they used to be”, or so she says! She used to do a lot of cross-stitch and crochet, as well as sewing many dresses for me when I was a young girl. She crocheted our entire family stockings to use over the mantle, and cross-stitched tiny stockings to use as ornaments. She made a set of the entire family (including pets!) to hang on her tree, and then an extra set for each of us to use on our own tree. I’m the oldest and only married grand-child, so she made a set for my husband and I, and added our son and pets too. I could go on and on, but I could be here all day, as we all could about our grandmothers!

    This tutorial was excellent, and I only wish I saw it in time to make the craft with my 5th grade class! Think I’ll bookmark this and use it next year! Thanks for sharing.

  • Danielle says:

    My grandma taught me to make these too! Such blessed memories! Thanks for sharing!

  • Anne says:

    Someone made me one as a gift years ago too. Except the middle part was left open for a picture. I think my 6th grade picture is still in it at my parent’s house. It was one of my favorite ornaments…I might have to attempt to making them now. 🙂

  • connie says:

    MY MOM MADE THESE FOR OUR FAMILY REUNION, BUT I ENDED UP NOT GETTING ONE. SHE DIED A FEW YEARS AGO. THE 23RD OF AUGUST WAS HER BIRTHDAY. TODAY WOULD OF BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER’S BIRTHDAY. SHE DIED IN 1969. THEY BOTH TAUGHT ME MANY THINGS. I MIGHT MAKE ONE OF THESE FOR MY GRANDCHILDREN THIS CHRISTMAS. RIGHT NOW I AM BUSY WITH MAKING THE SHAPE OF OHIO AND PUTTING A POSTAGE SIZE PIC OF MY MOM AND HER 7 BROTHERS AND SISTERS AND ON THE OTHER SIDE A PIC OF MY GRANDPARENTS HAVE MY OLDEST GRANDDAUGHTER HELPING ME HAVE TO MAKE 200. REUNION THE LAST SAT. OF AUGUST.

  • Linda says:

    Thank you so much for this beautiful idea. Every year I make ornaments for my staff and coworkers. Thanks to this I’m able to switch up a snowflake pattern my Mom has shared with me over the years.

  • Sharon says:

    I’ve been looking for this one so thank you.

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