52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Make Homemade Cards {Week 48}

Making Homemade Cards

(Homemade cards made by Amanda.)

Every week for 52 weeks, I’m sharing a different way you can save $100 this year. If you do all of these things, you’ll be able to save over $5,000 this year alone! Many of these things will likely be things you’re already doing, but hopefully all of you will pick up at least a few new ideas or some inspiration from this series.

You can spend a lot of money buying Hallmark cards… possibly as much as $100 per year, or more. For instance, if you typically spend $4 per card and you purchase 25 cards per year for birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, and other occasions — that’s $100 per year you’re spending on something that will most likely just be thrown out after it’s received.

Making Homemade Cards

Instead of having that money go straight into the trash can, save yourself a nice chunk of change by making your own homemade cards. Not only is it a fun way to exercise your creativity, it also will often be a lot more meaningful.

Make Handmade Cards

There are so many different ways to make your own homemade cards. If you have some magazines, cardstock, and glue, you can get creative making collage cards with cut-out words, phrases, and pictures that remind you of the card’s recipient.

Mixed Molly has some fantastic ideas for recycling last year’s Christmas cards into new Christmas cards for this year. You could use this same idea for cards for other occasions, too.

It doesn’t have to cost a lot of money or take a lot of time to make a homemade card. You probably have supplies on hand that could work. However, if you want to, you can come up some really amazing homemade card ideas, too.

Not Crafty? Write a Letter Instead!

Maybe you feel like you’re not crafty and creative at all. Never fear! You don’t have to pull out the glue gun and glitter. Write a meaningful letter, instead!

Here’s an idea from Victoria who blogs at Snail Pace Transformations:

I don’t remember the exact Mother’s day. I don’t remember even why I picked that Mother’s day to give this gift, but I have been forever touched by it’s impact.

That year I grabbed a dollar store card, and in it, I placed a simple list written on plain paper. Little did I realize how much my mother would cherish that list. Perhaps if I did, I would have chosen nicer paper. Perhaps I would have used my best handwriting, but then again, I doubt that would have changed the cord it struck in my mother’s heart.

On the list, written with the ink of a inexpensive dollar store pen, were 10 things my mom held dear.

What were those 10 things? What was that list? Why did it touch my mother’s heart so?

The title read “10 Reasons Why I am Glad You Are My Mother”.

Each point I thought about, some were simple “I love your habit of backwards dinners” some were more deep “thanks for providing the best you could for me with what you had”.

Never was a thank you said, never was the list even mentioned until one year when my mom knew her time on earth was coming to an end. She said, “honey, the best Mother’s day gift you ever gave me was that list. In fact, I still have it an read it often”.

Words (not things) have lasting power.

Do you have any quick, easy, and inexpensive homemade card ideas? I’d love to hear about them — and feel free to share links to your blog post(s) or other ideas online, too!

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Other posts in the 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year series

  1. 52 Different Ways to Save at Least $100 This Year: Bake Your Own Bread (Week #1)
  2. 52 Ways to Save at Least $100 This Year: Make Your Own Coffee at Home (Week #2)
  3. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 This Year: Ditch Your Cable Package {Week 3}
  4. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Order Prescription Glasses Online {Week 4}
  5. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Make Your Own Homemade Cleaners {Week 5}
  6. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Make Your Own Homemade Mixes {Week 6}
  7. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Become a One-Car Family {Week 7}
  8. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Surround Yourself With Frugal Friends {Week 8}
  9. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 a Year: Eliminate Disposable Products {Week 9}
  10. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 a Year: Cut Your Own Hair {Week 10}
  11. 52 Different Ways to Save at Least $100 Per Year: Use Cloth Diapers {Week 11}
  12. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Become Best Friends With Your Freezer {Week 12}
  13. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Rent Movies for FREE {Week 13}
  14. 52 Different Ways to Save at Least $100 Per Year: Ask for a Discount {Week 14}
  15. 52 Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Cancel Your Gym Membership {Week 15}
  16. 52 Ways to Save at Least $100 Per Year: Get the Best Bang for Your Buck at Yard Sales {Week 16}
  17. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Grow Some Of Your Food {Week 17}
  18. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Cut Back on the Soda Pop Habit {Week 18}
  19. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 This Year: Buy in Bulk {Week 19}
  20. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Price-Match at Walmart {Week 20}
  21. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 This Year: Ditch Your Landline {Week 21}
  22. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 This Year: Refinance Your Mortgage {Week 22}
  23. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Follow a Local Deal Blogger {Week 23}
  24. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Use a Coupon Database {Week 24}
  25. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Plan a Weekly Menu {Week 25}
  26. 52 Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Strategically Use Daily Deal Sites {Week 26}
  27. 52 Different Ways to Save At Least $100 Per Year: Shop at Aldi {Week 27}
  28. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Buy Used Books {Week 28)
  29. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Buy Used Clothing {Week 29}
  30. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Shop With Cash {Week 30}
  31. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Eat Less Meat {Week 31}
  32. 52 Different Ways to Save at Least $100 Per Year: Is this really a good deal? {Week 32}
  33. 52 Ways to Save $100 Per Year: 3 Ways to Save on Online Orders {Week 33}
  34. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Turn Your Clutter Into Cash {Week 34}
  35. 52 Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Get Organized {Week 35}
  36. 52 Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Have an All-Cash Christmas {Week 36}
  37. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Sign Up for Swagbucks {Week 37}
  38. 52 Different Ways to Save at Least $100 Per Year: Cut Your Fuel Costs {Week 38}
  39. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Frequent the Library {Week 39}
  40. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Simplify Birthday Parties {Week 40}
  41. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Brown Bag It {Week 41}
  42. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Make Your Own Snacks {Week 42}
  43. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Use a Programmable Thermostat {Week 43}
  44. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Limit Eating Out {Week 44}
  45. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Get a Bang for Your Buck on Travel Expenses {Week 45}
  46. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Don't Pay For Pre-Made Baby Food {Week 46}
  47. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Eat More Beans {Week 47}
  48. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Make Homemade Cards {Week 48}
  49. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Shop At More Than One Store {Week 49}
  50. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Eat From the Pantry {Week 50}
  51. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Stay Home More {Week 51}
  52. 52 Different Ways to Save $100 Per Year: Develop Contentment {Week 52}

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Comments

  1. Elizabeth says

    Thanks for this post! I enjoy making homemade cards and find that it saves me not only money, but also time. For me at least, it’s really does take a lot of time to put “purchase card” on a to-do list or shopping list, get to the store, pick out the perfect one from among all the options, make sure I don’t crunch it in the bag on the way home, and finally sit down and write it out and put it in the mail! It’s easier for me to pull out my craft supplies.

    However, as my finances have been tight, I haven’t been restocking my craft supplies, so it’s harder for me to make cards now than when I had more supplies on hand. Nowadays, I might turn to card stock or plain printer paper, colored markers, and shapes and letters cut from colored paper. It doesn’t have to be very fancy to be beautiful and heartfelt. :)

  2. says

    After becoming a mom, I discovered that my parents and my husband like cards that are decorated by my son or with pictures of my son (for when those great deals for free picture cards–shipped deals come about). My dad still has a Father’s Day card with a picture of my son from a couple of years ago, still posted on the fridge.

  3. Lindsey Swinborne says

    Wow, I was so thrilled and surprised to see the pic of my friend’s cards here today! Neat! Ironically, our church just started a prayer/card ministry and I attended the first meeting today and we filled out cards for people and prayed for them. I had forgotten about the juice-can-lid cards and we were talking about creative ideas for cards for our ministry. I’m going to have to use this post for inspiration…again! Thanks Crystal!

  4. Theresa says

    Homemade cards are really great. However if you’re short on time, Walmart sells the Value Hallmark cards. These cards are $0.49 or a $1 and look really nice. Dollar stores are also great places to find inexpensive cards. Party City also sells their cards for a dollar. After discovering Walmart’s dollar cards, I don’t pay more than a dollar for cards (unless I really, really, really like the card and have a specific person the card would be perfect for). We send cards to all of our parents, grandparents, siblings, nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles. We have a big family so it is quite a lot of cards but I don’t see a lot of these family members. It’s my way of staying in touch with them. And I figure my relatives are worth more than $2 (the cost of the card plus the stamp).

  5. Annie says

    Thanks for the ideas!

    I cut cards and designs to add to them from gift boxes, gift bags (especially those that have been ripped or wrinkled and don’t look nice enough to reuse as gift bags), and greeting cards that my family receives.

    Also, the “recycling last year’s Christmas cards” link in this post doesn’t work.

  6. Katie says

    Although not exactly a money-saving option per se, another idea along these lines — when attending a baby shower, spend the money you would have used for a card on a children’s book. Inscribe the book with a personal message & include it with your gift in lieu of a card. That way, instead of just tossing the card after reading it, the mom-to-be has a book she can save & share with her child, complete with an inscription from whoever gave it to her. I have seen this done at several baby showers & the moms love it!

  7. Anitra says

    I like hand-making cards, and I encourage my kids to do it, but I just don’t have the energy for it at this stage of life. (Kindergartener, 3-year-old, another on the way). So, my husband and I were pretty thrilled to discover Treat.com. You can make personalized cards for the same price as a Hallmark card or less – it’s been great to give meaningful, personalized cards for birthdays, etc. this year for $2.50 each (you can pay even less if you buy a large “subscription” up front). They’ll even send them for you for the price of a stamp, if you don’t mind not being able to sign it.

    Not trying to sound like an advertisement, but we’re really happy with them – the only problem is that you need to make your cards at least 3-4 days before the occasion you need them!